• Class-B Aggregate Exposure: 85% Fine Aggregate, 5-15% Cement Fines and Coarse Aggregate.

  • Class-C Aggregate Exposure: 80-90% coarse aggregate, 10-20% blend of cement fines and fine aggregate.

Part I: Before Framing

Grinding on an Open Slab

Most of the time grinding is done to achieve an aesthetic. If a slab is to be ground to expose Class B or Class C aggregate or scored without borders that should happen before framing.

We hone, polish, and grind the concrete to Class-B or Class C aggregate exposure, processing in several passes with progressively finer bonded diamond abrasives exposing small and medium rocks (aggregate).

The floor will then be densified, polished, and treated with stain guard.

Grinding on an open slab.

Grinding on an open slab.

Grinding on an open slab.

Grinding on an open slab.


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Scoring on an Open Slab

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The concrete on a new slab is softer and ideal for scoring.

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See our Diamond polished Concrete Guide for an in depth look at our work and process.

See our Diamond polished Concrete Guide for an in depth look at our work and process.

Class B - some percentage of cement fines left.

Class B - some percentage of cement fines left.

Class C - some percentage of cement fines left.

Class C - some percentage of cement fines left.

Class C - some percentage of cement fines left.

Class C - some percentage of cement fines left.

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  • If floor is to be scored without borders that should happen before framing.


Part II: After Dried in, Before Drywall

Finishing to Class A aggregate exposure, staining, polishing, and sealing should happen after the house is 100% dried-in, but before installing drywall. We will hone, stain, dye, densify and seal concrete and then cover it with ram board.

  • To score the floors if the walls are framed, we can either score to a border or to the walls with a hand held tool to cut lines up to the walls - some change in the texture of the lines should be expected in this instance.

  • When using foam insulation, schedule floor and covering beforehand (that stuff sticks to concrete well enough to require grinding to remove).

We use dye to adjust the stain color if needed. dyes help us get shades of greys or black.

 

Part III: Final Polish

Q:What is a Final Polish?

A: A final polish is the application of a final coat of stain-guard. We polish that into the floor with an 800 grit diamond-impregnated pad on a propane-powered burnisher. The final polish is not a cleaning service. We budget roughly one hour per 1000s/f to get it ready for stain-guard and polishing. This can be omitted if you like how the floors look now.

Q: When Should the Final Polish be scheduled?

A: At the end of construction, after appliance installation, plumbing and electrical trim-out, and amid the final cleaning. The floor needs to be clean and dry for that, but it makes a little bit of dust so it should be scheduled at the very end of your project but still expect your clean up crew to do a final touch up.


Q: Should the masking paper be replaced?

A: Painters and the drywall guys can be really messy and the trim carpenters work really cleanly. The paper around the perimeter of the room may require replacement while leaving ram board intact.

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